Connecting people with nature in Ontario's Mississippi Valley

Ed Lawrence is for the Birds

Press Release
Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists
March 25, 2002
Submitted by Susan Fisher

Ed Lawrence is for the Birds

SunflowerEd Lawrence is for the Birds Gardening guru, Ed Lawrence, drew a crowd of nature lovers March 21, to hear details of how to grow a garden with birds in mind. The evening was organized by the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists as part of its popular on-going series of nature presentations and field trips.

With the help of slides and a detailed handout, Mr. Lawrence offered a bonanza of tips on the best species of trees, shrubs and flowers guaranteed to appeal to our feathered friends. Pines are high on the list of bird havens. Their rough, dense foliage offers good nesting, protection from weather and predators, while the cones and seeds are good to eat. Sweet, sticky maple buds attract bugs in the spring, and bugs will bring the birds.

The horticultural expert also spoke of the importance of leaving dead trees to rot, if at all possible. As the wood disintegrates, it becomes home for many tasty insects, fungi and other organisms that are important to the functioning of an ecosystem. Imperfect foliage is a good sign! It means that insects and bugs are helping themselves because the leaves have not been sprayed with toxic pesticides.

How you arrange your garden can be important, too. Birds are more likely to visit a garden that is broken into curves and a diversity of heights, colours and species, rather than a straight hedgerow. Water is important. Just a simple birdbath will do. Even better­hang a 2-litre bottle with a pin-hole in the bottom over the birdbath. The slow drip-drip will be irrestible to many bird species.

Mr. Lawrence is perhaps best known as CBC radio’s popular gardening expert. He is well respected for his down-to-earth advice and his environmentally friendly solutions to gardening problems. From 1997 until last year, he oversaw the grounds and greenhouses for the six official residences in the National Capital Region, including that of the Prime Minister. He is now the horticultural specialist for the N.C.C.

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