Connecting people with nature in Ontario's Mississippi Valley

Canoe Journeys #15 Appleton and Mississippi River downriver

Appleton and Mississippi River downriver

How to Get There: From Ottawa Hwy. 7 to Appleton Side Rd. 3 km before Carleton Place. North to River Rd. and into Appleton village. Do not cross river.

The Launch Site: Small park below falls.

The Paddle: Explore bay and downriver towards Almonte. Land canoes under bridge beside Old town Hall, take River Walk under RR bridtge to explore downtown. Not recommended during spring flood.

Watch For: Old mill ruins, small hydro generating station, wetland shores. Herons abound. No lunch landing spots.

Seasonal Information: Be cautious of fast currents in spring flood. Warning: waterfalls: do not approach town bridge during spring flood.

 

Continue reading...

Field Naturalists Took Temperature of Mississippi River Watershed

Field Naturalists Took Temperature of Mississippi River Watershed

August 17, 2006

by Cliff Bennett

When a child is showing signs of stress, we naturally take its temperature. With the potential of climate change to stress the Mississippi River watershed, the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists (MVFN) decided to take its temperature. So, from Upper Lake Mazinaw at one end, to the Ottawa River at the other, we took the temperature of lakes and rivers of the watershed. The volunteer driven water-temperature survey, conducted on the August holiday weekend, was one of 75 projects celebrating the 75th Anniversary of Ontario Nature, formerly The Federation of Ontario Naturalists. As an outreach project, the goal was to engage the public in considering the implications of future climate change for the Mississippi River.
The health of our lakes and rivers is important to us: the watershed is where we live and play. Water temperature, levels, flow patterns and distribution of flora and fauna are not static; change can occur quickly in response to various environmental stresses. Water temperature, specifically maximum surface-water temperature, usually occurring during the first week of August in our watershed, is one important control on the distribution of aquatic plants and animals which can be measured.

Eighty to one hundred people, MVFN members and other volunteers, thermometers and home-made water-samplers in hand, set out in canoes, row boats and motor boats to take the watersheds’ temperature in the perfect weather of August 5-7th. From families in rented canoes, people in motor boats, and those sampling from bridges and docks, we thank all participants who helped make the survey a success! Please send in your location and temperature data if you have not already done so, as information on all lakes and river sections within the watershed is valuable. Raw data will be archived with MVC and the field naturalists.

The water-temperature survey project was a result of nearly a year of planning by MVFN organizers, coordinated by Cliff Bennett and including Paul Eggington, Michael Macpherson, Michael McPhail, Howard Robinson and Pauline Donaldson. Of course, MVFN could not have completed this Herculean effort without partnerships with Lake Associations, local Fish and Game Clubs, and volunteers from NRCan, to which heartfelt thanks and congratulations are extended. Special thanks go to Mississippi Valley Conservation (MVC) staff member Susan Lee and summer student Tom Thistle, whose efforts in contacting and encouraging the Lake Associations were outstanding.

In all, an estimated 500 plus temperature readings were collected, both at the surface and one metre deep across the watershed. Collected at a single point in time they will provide a baseline of data on temperature distribution across the watershed. The baseline can be used for assessing future change. In addition, lake associations and other groups can use the data in a more specific way, for example to look at temperature variations within their lake or river area to locate useful sites where data loggers could record future change as it happens. Already, as a result of this project, temperature loggers were installed by lake conservationists in Buckshot Lake, Clayton Lake and White Lake, and plans are underway to install them in additional places. Valuable ongoing monitoring work also continues to be done by volunteers such as Lake Stewards and organizations such as MVC and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.

Future climate change is only one environmental stress which may change our watershed. The provincial government and MVC have now begun serious consideration of the implications of future climate change. Hopefully, our work will encourage the local public to engage in discussions about how we can manage future change. Just what is at risk and how can we best adapt to changes that are already underway?

Once all of the water temperature results are in, MVFN will prepare a summary report of the 2006 water-temperature survey for public release. Copies will also be sent to participating groups and individuals and posted on our website at www.mvfn.ca. For further information on this or other MVFN projects, please contact MVFN President Michael McPhail at 613-256-7211 or .

Continue reading...

Canoe Journeys – #17 Mississippi River from Pakenham Upriver

#17  Mississippi River from Pakenham Upriver

How to Get There: North from Almonte on Hwy. 29 to Pakenham, or from Ottawa, north on Hwy. 417 to Kinburn Side Rd.  and west to Pakenham and over Five Span Stone Bridge.
The Launch Site: In Pakenham, find park behind public school. Launch at swimming beach.

The Paddle: Upriver to foot of Blakeney Falls.

Watch For: Beautiful shorelines, herons and other birds. Indian Creek through tunnel under roadway, shoreline wild flowers. Lunch site at Falls.

Seasonal Information: Good until freeze-up. WARNING: Don’t get swept downstream from this launch site during spring flood.

Continue reading...

Canoe Journeys – #8 Dalhousie Lake and Mississippi River Downriver

#8 Dalhousie Lake and Mississippi River downstream

#8 (Lanark Highlands)

This canoe trip is a pleasant glide down a portion of the Mississippi River as it flows out of Dalhousie Lake, along mostly marshy shores, habitat for several species of birds and ducks, muskrat and turtles.

Travel to McDonald’s Corners, west of Lanark Village. Then go north on County Road 8 to the bridge, about one km.

Park in the park and boat launch on the lake side of the bridge. Paddle under the bridge and go downstream as far as Sheridan’s Rapids. Be careful not to go through the rapids unless you are a confident white-water canoeist.

You will find several places in this area (with permission of property owners) to stop and have lunch before canoeing back upriver to your vehicles.

Watch for a side trip north into McCullough’s Mud Lake. The depth of water in this mud lake will determine how far in you can go. It’s well worth while exploring.Wetland birds along shores. Beaver, muskrat, and otter.

Upon returning, you might like a cup of tea at the nearby restaurant.

Continue reading...

Canoe Journeys – #6 Stump Lake and Mississippi River Downstream

Stump Lake and Mississippi River Downstream

#6 (Lanark Highlands)

How to get there: From Perth, take Hwy 511 to Balderson, left on County Rd. 7 through Fallbrook to County Rd. 12, left on County Rd 12 through McDonald’s Corners to Elphin and north on County Rd 36 two km, to Stump Lake.

The Launch Site: Small park and dock. Picnic table and privy.

The Paddle: Follow lakeshore clockwise and into the river. Take left shore upriver to rocky area and rapids. Good spot to lunch and explore. Rugged, be careful. Return on north side and into branch of river to end and waterfall (McLaren Depot Snye). Return to launch site or explore Stump Lake to High Falls Dam and back.

Watch for: Many bays and streams to explore. Also watch for submerged stumps.

Seasonal information: Great for autumn colours. Good until freeze-up.

Continue reading...