Connecting people with nature in Ontario's Mississippi Valley

“Wild Nights with the Moths of Dunrobin”

Over, Under and Through – A Closer Look at Nature

Lynn Scott

Thursday, October 17th, the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists continues its 2019-2020 speaker series, “Over, Under and Through – A Closer Look at Nature”. Our second speaker in the series is Lynn Scott.

Lynn Scott, amateur lepidopterist, spent more than 10 years photographing moths at her front door in Dunrobin.

“Natural science has always been part of my life,” she says, “but the combination of a new single-reflex digital camera and very late nights arriving home from contentious school board meetings resulted in a new passion. With close-up photographs, I could discover so much more about the winged creatures who clustered around my porch lights, and moths were really fun!”

Lynn will walk us through her journey of discover – photographing and identifying moths. When the available field guides and internet searches proved insufficient for identifying what she photographed, Lynn made connections with lepidopterists at the Canadian National Collection of Insects in Ottawa, contributing data and specimens.

The data she compiled is still being used in the scientific community to further understanding of the amazing diversity of moths, their geographic ranges and flight seasons. Some of her photographs have been published in books, and she has recently contributed her accumulated data and photos of more than 1,000 species of moths to be incorporated in the Ontario Moth Atlas.

Before her retirement, Lynn worked with her husband as a consultant in telecommunications technology. She has been a trustee of the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board for almost 25 years and is currently chair of the board.

Date: Thursday, October 18, 2019

Time: 7:00 p.m. for socializing & refreshments, 7:30 for program

Place: Almonte United Church Social Hall, 106 Elgin St., Almonte

Admission is free for MVFN members (check your membership card). There is an admission fee of $5 for non-members. No charge for youth 18 and under. We always welcome new members.

We hope to see you there!

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“Incredible Journeys: The New Science of Bird Migration”

Inaugural talk in the 2019-2020 nature Talks:

Over, Under and Through  –  A Closer Look at Nature

 

 

Pamela Stagg

 

“Incredible Journeys: The New Science of Bird Migration”

 

 

 

 

Thursday, September 19th, the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists launches its 2019-2020 speaker series, “Over, Under and Through – A Closer Look at Nature”. Our first speaker in the series will be Pamela Stagg.

Pamela’s presentation “Incredible Journeys: The New Science of Bird Migration will focus on how citizen scientists, high tech scientists and researchers are combining their efforts to look into the mysterious and gruelling journeys that migratory birds take. When NASA, the Nature Conservancy and ordinary people, “citizen scientists”, collaborate to study and help conserve birds, the results are extraordinary.

For those who like to “read ahead”, the following link will introduce you to Ebird. The largest citizen-science project in the world.

Date: Thursday, September 19, 2019

Time: 7:00 p.m. for socializing & refreshments, 7:30 for program

Place: Almonte United Church Social Hall, 106 Elgin St., Almonte

Admission is free for MVFN members (check your membership card). There is an admission fee of $5 for non-members. No charge for youth 18 and under. We always welcome new members.

Please refrain from wearing scented products such as perfumes/colognes, hair products, cosmetics, and scented lotions while attending this event,

We hope to see you there!

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The Secret Life of Lichens

On Thursday, January 17, the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists 2018-19 series “Earth, Water, Wind and Fire” continues with a presentation by Troy McMullin Ph.D.,  lichenologist with the Canadian Museum of Nature. Our speaker has studied lichens throughout Canada and internationally, and has published extensively on this group, including the 2015 book Common Lichens of Northeastern North America: A Field Guide, co-authored with Frances Anderson.

Join Troy to explore the often overlooked, but beautiful and fascinating world of lichens.  Learn about their role in different ecosystems, rare species in southern Ontario, and how they are used in medicine, science, and more.  You will gain a new appreciation for the small things in life!

Teloschistes chrysophthalmus or Golden-eye lichen; the Great Lakes population of this species has a status of ENDANGERED in Ontario. Photo provided by speaker

 

Speaker: Troy McMullin Ph.D.

Presentation: The Secret Life of Lichens

Date:   Thursday, January 17, 2019

Time:  7:00 PM for socializing & refreshments, 7:30 for program

Place:  Almonte United Church Social Hall, 106 Elgin St., Almonte

Admission: is free for MVFN members. There is an admission fee of $5 for non-members. No charge for youth 18 and under. We always welcome new members.

For further information, please contact Cliff Bennett MVFN Program Chair at or 613-798-6295.

A NOTE ABOUT A VERY RARE LICHEN

Golden-eye lichen (Teloschistes chrysophthalmus), Great Lakes population, is ENDANGERED in Ontario. Ontario Species at Risk information for this species, as follows, can be found at https://www.ontario.ca/page/golden-eye-lichen-great-lakes-population#section-0

“The Great Lakes Population of Golden-eye lichen is vulnerable to several threats due to its limited restriction to a single host tree. Threats that may impact on this population include severe weather events, invasive species, acidification from air pollution and recreational activities . . .

What you can do?

Report a sighting

Report a sighting of an endangered animal or plant to the Natural Heritage Information Centre. Photographs with specific locations or mapping coordinates are always helpful.

Volunteer

Volunteer with your local nature club or provincial park to participate in surveys or stewardship work focused on species at risk.

Be a good steward

Private land owners have a very important role to play in species recovery. If you find Golden-eye Lichen on your land, you may be eligible for stewardship programs that support the protection and recovery of species at risk and their habitats.

 

 

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The Worst Invasive Plant in Ontario Wetlands

On Thursday, November 15th, the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists 2018-19 series “Earth, Water, Wind and Fire” continues with a presentation by wildlife biologist Ken Allison, local Lanark County resident and former President of MVFN and the Ottawa Field Naturalists’ Club.

When Ken spoke about roadside and aquatic invasive plants in his “Green Aliens in Lanark County” presentation in 2012, invasive Phragmites, did not seem to be on this invasive plant expert’s radar.

However, during his upcoming presentation, Ken will focus on this plant, (Phragmites australis subspecies australis), one of the worst aquatic invasive plant species there is. He will explore the features of a healthy wetland, before leading us into the unhealthy realm of a wetland invaded by these disruptive plants!

Learn from Ken how to identify this plant and distinguish it from native Phragmites (Phragmites australis subspecies americanus) and other invasive plants, and how to deal with them on your property.

Ontario Phragmites Working Group: “When attempting to manage and control invasive Phragmites, it is important to first determine if the plants you are managing are the native or invasive strain of Phragmites. Native Phragmites is an important component of a healthy wetland ecosystem. It grows in marshes and unlike the invasive strain, does not typically develop into dense monocultures or degrade habitat quality.”

The Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists and other groups are helping to map the distribution of this invasive species in Ontario. For more information visit https://www.eddmaps.org/ontario/

Ken and Phragmites. photo Ruth Allison

 

Speaker: Ken Allison, Wildlife Biologist

Presentation: The Worst Invasive Plant in Ontario Wetlands

Date:   Thursday, November 15, 2018

Time:  7:00 p.m. for socializing & refreshments, 7:30 for program

Place:  Almonte United Church Social Hall, 106 Elgin St., Almonte

Admission is free for MVFN members. There is an admission fee of $5 for non-members. No charge for youth 18 and under. We always welcome new members.

For further information, please contact Cliff Bennett MVFN Program Chair at or 613-798-6295.

 

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The Significance of Glaciation in Canada and the Ottawa Valley

On Thursday, October 18th , the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists 2018-19 Natural History Speaker series “Earth, Water, Wind and Fire” continues with a presentation by glacial and hydrogeology expert, Dr. David Sharpe, Geological Survey of Canada, Natural Resources Canada

Where or when were there once glaciers or massive glacial floods, in the Ottawa Valley or elsewhere in Canada? Find out at  Dr. David Sharpe’s presentation “The Significance of Glaciation in Canada and the Ottawa Valley.”  Knowledge of the origin and nature of glaciation in our region, is used by geologists and hydrogeologists at the Geological Survey of Canada, to inform mineral exploration, groundwater investigations, and to guide land use and construction plans.

And where there were glaciers and changes to them over time, evidence shows there were also likely massive glacial floods!

Dr. Sharpe will explore the intriguing details of how the glaciated Canadian landscape has been modified not only by the retreating glaciers, but by very large glacial floods that were discharged from under continental ice sheets.

Speaker: Dr. David Sharpe

Presentation: The Significance of Glaciation in Canada and the Ottawa Valley

Date:   Thursday, October 18, 2018

Time:  7:00 PM  for socializing & refreshments, 7:30 PM for program

Place:  Almonte United Church Social Hall, 106 Elgin St., Almonte

For further information, please contact Cliff Bennett at: or 613-798-6295.

 

 

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