Connecting people with nature in Ontario's Mississippi Valley
Mississippi River at Pakenham

Other Canoe & Kayak Routes

Other suggested canoe routes, not listed in MVFN’s Canoe & Kayak Journeys brochure. Listed here individually.

North Crotch Lake

This newly described route suggestion is not included in MVFN’s first edition Lanark County Canoe & Kayak Journeys

How to Get There: From Perth, take Hwy. 511 to County Rd. 16 north of Hopetown. Go west on # 16 through Lavant to County Rd. 509. Go north on #509 to village of Ompah. Just before the fire hall, turn south on South Bush Road to the boat launch on Crotch Lake.

The Launch Site: There are two sites, past the rapids.

The Paddle: Take your pick, according to winds. Many bays, also wetland creeks at end of bays. This is all Crown land. Many picnic sites.

Watch For: Many camping places available by permit. For camping information www.northfrontenacparklands.ca.

Seasonal Information: Good until freeze-up

Bob’s Lake

Bob’s Lake is west of Perth and south of Maberly and a little outside the perimeter of our present canoe trips. However, after having explored it, I think it is well worth doing.

How to Get There: From Maberly, which is west of Perth on Highway #7, go south on Bolingbroke Road (County Road 36) to the hamlet of Bolingbroke. Turn west on Crow Lake Road about five km to Bardour Road. This road only goes south. Follow along until you reach residence #392A/392B.

Launch Site: Just past this residence about ten meters, the road narrows between two bodies of water. Park here and put in your canoe on the east side (to your left). There is only enough space to launch one canoe at a time.

The Paddle: This section of Bob’s Lake called Mill Bay contains many bays and islands and we found it took all our time to canoe just this part of the lake, including lunch time. There are a couple of small islands that make a good stop for lunch.  Keep your directions straight, don’t get lost and, enjoy!

Watch For: We paddled through a wonderful channel of wild rice, put up many ducks, mostly blacks, and studied an osprey nest on a small island.

Seasonal Information: Good all open season. Please respect posted property.

Irish Creek

How to Get There: From Smiths Falls, take County Rd. 43 east towards Merrickville. At Kilmarnock Road, turn south, cross over the Rideau Canal locks and proceed on Kilmarnock Rd. to Rose’s Bridge Road where you turn left to Rose’s Bridghe, about 1/2 km.

Launch Site: Rose’s Bridge, west side. This is Irish Creek

The Paddle: Follow the meandering open channel, through the extensive wetlands along both shores. At the village of Jasper, duck under the local bridge (or portage over it) and continue upstream as far as you can until you reach the beaver dam. Total distance is almost ten km. On the way back, just before the railway bridge is an abandoned bridge abutment with a large single elm tree on it. This is a good place to stop for a picnic lunch.

If you have time upon return to Rose’s Bridge, follow under the bridge and into the Rideau River for further canoeing.

Watch For: Abundant wetland flora and fauna; many pairs of black terns, beaver and muskrat, great blue herons

Seasonal Information: Best before late summer or with high water.

Canonto Lake

This trip is about the furthest away from home. Canoto Lake is in North Frontenac and connects with Palmerston Lake. From any direction, travel to Hopetown on highway 511. Go north a few kms to Lanark County Road 16, turn west, through Poland and on to the end of 16 at 509. Travel north on 509 a few kms to the Canoto/Palmerston Conservation Area sign. Turn east on this road. Do not turn off towards Conservation area which is a few kms down the road (unless you want to visit it) but continue east to the public boat launch at the east end of Canoto Lake, about 6km. Launch you canoe into the short river which leads into the lake. This is a very pretty lake, with islands and numerous little bays to stop and have lunch (with permission of property owners). You will probably get around half the lake before lunch time and, depending upon how long you want to paddle, decide when you want to turn back to your car.

Burnstown 1 and Madawaska River

Burnstown is a small, historic Hamlet, north of the Village of White Lake. For this canoe journey, there are two ways to get to the canoe launch. Go north of Arnprior on highway 17 to the turn off at highway 508 to Burnstown and Calabogie. About a km before Burnstown is a municipal park along the Madawaska River where you can put in the canoe. Depending upon availability, there is a gal who collects $1.00 for launching canoes. The second way to get there is to turn west in the Village of Pakenham on Waba Road (Scoops is just around the corner) and travel to White Lake. Turn north at the intersection and Burnstown is the next hamlet. At the junction just over the big bridge, turn right and the park is down that road about a km. Launch your canoe and travel down stream (to the left) following the shoreline and exploring the little bays. Depending upon the season, there are many rare wildflowers on the bands and in the forests. Upon arriving before the big Stewartville Dam, glide across the river to a sloping cow pasture, where you can stop for lunch (with permission of property owners). After lunch, follow the south shoreline back to the park.

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Our natural history talks are at 7:30 pm on the third Thursday in January, February, March, April,  September, October and November at Almonte United Church, 106 Elgin St. in Almonte, Ontario. All are welcome to attend! Non-members $5. 

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