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Mississippi River at Pakenham

Carleton Place CBC

Carleton Place Christmas Bird Count 2005

Carleton Place Count: click for detailed statistics  – species seen and their numbers by sector within the count circle.

The 62nd annual Carleton Place Christmas Bird Count took place on Tuesday December 27th 2005. The count area is a circle of 15 miles diameter centered on the bridge over the Mississippi River in Carleton Place and included Almonte, most of Ramsay and Beckwith, some of Drummond and an adjacent part of the City of Ottawa . In the morning the sky was clear with a temperature of -8°C and in the afternoon it was -3°C and cloudy. There was lots of snow on the ground but mild weather beforehand resulted in many streams and the Mississippi River being more open than usual. 39 field observers and 31 feeder operators took part.

The number of species seen was 47, which is above average. The number of birds counted was 7473, which is also above average. The all-time highs are 50 species and 8855 birds. No new species for the count were tallied, but the first American Black Duck since 1995 was found on the Mississippi near the Highway 7 bridge, the second-only Golden Eagle was seen near Ashton, and the second-only Carolina Wren was seen at a feeder in Carleton Place, the first since 1975.

There were also record highs counts of the following species:

Common Goldeneye 64 (previous high 43 in 1991)

Wild Turkey 169 (previous high 72 in 2004)

Barred Owl 2 (tied previous highs)

Black-capped Chickadee 1320 (previous high 1230 in 1994).

The count was organized by Cliff Bennett. At the end of the day the field observers gathered at the 7 West Cafe to see the field results displayed. Georgina Doe organized the feeder counts and Mike Jaques compiled the final results. The Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists sponsored the count.Team leaders in the field were Iain Wilkes, Mike Jaques of Carleton Place, Tine Kuiper, Lynda Bennett, of Ramsay; Brenda Carter, Merrickville, Al Potvin, Allan Goddard, Pip Winters, Almonte, Don Brown, Kanata, Arnie Simpson, Beckwith.

A list of all species seen and their numbers follows:

Canada Goose 14

American Black Duck 1

Mallard 5

Common Goldeneye 64

Common Merganser 5

Bald Eagle 1

Sharp-shinned Hawk 1

Northern Goshawk 1

Red-tailed Hawk 2

Rough-legged Hawk 2

Golden Eagle 1

Ruffed Grouse 3

Wild Turkey 169

Rock Pigeon 891

Mourning Dove 233

Barred Owl 2

Downy Woodpecker 77

Hairy Woodpecker 81

Pileated Woodpecker 4

Northern Shrike 6

Blue Jay 447

American Crow 390

Common Raven 11

Horned Lark 7

Black-capped Chickadee 1320

Red-breasted Nuthatch 12

White-breasted Nuthatch 116

Brown Creeper 3

Carolina Wren 1

Golden-crowned Kinglet 6

European Starling 541

Bohemian Waxwing 850

Cedar Waxwing 55

Eastern Towhee 1

American Tree Sparrow 119

Song Sparrow 1

White-throated Sparrow 2

Dark-eyed Junco 80

Snow Bunting 1123

Northern Cardinal 48

Red-winged Blackbird 2

Pine Grosbeak 27

Purple Finch 3

House Finch 3

Common Redpoll 276

Pine Siskin 39

American Goldfinch 295

Evening Grosbeak 97

House Sparrow 91

Also seen in the count week, but not on the day, were Cooper’s Hawk, American Kestrel and Merlin.

Lanark Highlands Christmas Bird Count

The following is from Cliff Bennett, compiler of the Lanark Highlands CBC, which is centred on the village of Watson’s Corners, NW of Lanark Village in Lanark County:

The 3rd Annual Lanark Highlands Christmas Bird Count took place on Friday, Dec. 30. The weather was mild, with partly sunny skies and little or no winds. However, the back country roads were very icy and getting out to walk was downright treacherous. The count yielded a lower tally than last year, probably much to do with the icy walking conditions.

Twenty-five counters took to the field and recorded 36 different species , one more than last year’s record. However, the total number of individual birds was over 400 fewer than last year. The real success story though, was the count from eleven different feeder observers spread around the circles.
They listed 719 birds, up about 350 from last year’s count.

Three new species for the count were recorded; a goshawk, two Canada geese and a red-breasted merganser. One species conspicuous by its absence was the great gray owl and significantly lower scores than last year were listed for ruffed grouse, hairy woodpecker, blue jays, crows, chickadees, white-breasted nuthatches, Bohemian waxwings and pine grosbeaks.

New records were set for wild turkeys (100), rock pigeons, red-breasted nuthatches, juncoes, pine siskins, American goldfinch and house sparrows.

Pakenham-Arnprior Counts: click for detailed statistics

Press Release
Written by:  Mike Jaques
January 5, 2005

The 61st annual Carleton Place Audubon Christmas Bird Count took place on Monday December 27th. Birds were counted within a circle of 15 miles diameter centered on the bridge over the Mississippi River in Carleton Place. The weather was bitterly cold but sunny with moderate wind-chill factor and lots of snow on the ground. Mississippi Lake, River and streams were frozen except where water was fast flowing. 27 field observers and 27 feeder operators took part in the count.

The number of species recorded was 45, a little better than usual. However, the number of birds counted was 4480, which is lower than normal. Two species never before seen on our count were tallied: a Tufted Titmouse near Almonte and an Eastern Towhee in Carleton Place. Both were coming to feeders in the weeks before the count and graciously stayed to be counted.

There were record high counts of four species:

Wild Turkey 72 (previous high 49 in 2001)

Great Gray Owl 2 (previous high 1, last seen in 2000)

Bald Eagle 2 (tied the previous high from 2003)

Barred Owl 2 (tied the previous high from 1984)

At the end of the day the field observers gathered at the 7 West Cafe to report their findings, enjoy refreshments and view the field results displayed on the master chart. The count was organized by on behalf of Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists by Cliff Bennett. Georgina Doe organized the feeder counts and Mike Jaques compiled the final results. Bennett thanked all participants for their efforts under trying weather conditions.

A list of all species recorded and their numbers is as follows;

Canada Goose 3

Common Goldeneye 40

Hooded Merganser 1

Common Merganser 1

Bald Eagle 2

Sharp-shinned Hawk 2

Northern Goshawk 2

Red-tailed Hawk 6

Rough-legged Hawk 1

Ruffed Grouse 14

Wild Turkey 72

Rock Pigeon 626

Mourning Dove 286

Barred Owl 2

Great Gray Owl 2

Downy Woodpecker 57

Hairy Woodpecker 64

Pileated Woodpecker 6

Northern Shrike 3

Blue Jay 300

American Crow 297

Common Raven 21

Horned Lark 15

Black-capped Chickadee 1038

Tufted Titmouse 1

Red-breasted Nuthatch 4

White-breasted Nuthatch 101

American Robin 3

European Starling 225

Bohemian Waxwing 46

Cedar Waxwing 55

Eastern Towhee 1

American Tree Sparrow 110

Song Sparrow 2

Dark-eyed Junco 35

Lapland Longspur 3

Snow Bunting 78

Northern Cardinal 65

Purple Finch 4

House Finch 17

Common Redpoll 328

Pine Siskin 23

American Goldfinch 278

Evening Grosbeak 6

House Sparrow 234

Bird Counts:

Xmas Bird Count 2004

Field Report

Feeder Report

Press Release
Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists
Submitted by:  Cliff Bennett
Friday, January 2, 2004

Christmas Bird Count 2003 Yields Bald Eagles

Results Christmas Bird Count 2003 

Bald EagleFinding and listing two bald eagles on the 59th Annual Carleton Place Audubon Christmas Bird Count (CBC) was well overdue. The large raptor had been spotted several times during the past few years during the count week but never before on count day. One was listed by the Pip Winters team on the Mississippi Lake shore in the Scotch Corners area while the other appeared to the Lynda Bennett team near Upper Perth Road in Lanark Highlands.

The Carleton Place CBC, conducted in one of over two thousand count circles in North and Central America and the Caribbean, was held on Saturday, December 27 in Spring-like conditions with no snow on the ground except in the bush, streams running in full flood and the Mississippi Lake more open than usual. Thirty-four field observers and thirty-three feeder counters took part in the local exercise and listed forty-four different species (above average) and 5829 individual birds (below average).

In addition to the first registry of the bald eagles, record high counts were made for Canada Goose, 318 (previous high 101) and Cooper’s Hawk, three (previous high only one). Also found to tie previous records were one Merlin, first listed in 1999 and one Northern Hawk-Owl, first found on a count day in 1965. Birders looking for the Hawk-Owl on Old Union Hall Road in Ramsay the next day, found American Robins, Red-winged Blackbirds and White-winged Crossbills, which were listed as found during the count week. Last year, 338 robins were found on count day, but none this year.

The complete list for the count is as follows:

Canada Goose, 318

Mallard, 1

Common Goldeneye, 30

Common Mergansers, 32

Bald Eagle, 2

Cooper’s Hawk, 3

Red-tailed Hawk, 14

Rough-legged Hawk, 10

Merlin, 1

Ruffed Grouse, 23

Wild Turkey, 34

Ring-billed Gull, 1

Herring Gulls, 29

Great Black-backed Gull, 1

Rock Pigeons, 512

Mourning Doves, 207

Northern Hawk-owl, 1

Downy Woodpecker, 55

Hairy Woodpecker, 62

Pileated Woodpecker, 11

Northern Shrike, 10

Blue Jays, 287

American Crow, 470

Common Raven, 14

Black-capped Chickadees, 1041

Red-breasted Nuthatch, 5

White-breasted Nuthatch 115,

Brown Creeper, 3

Starlings, 663

Bohemian Waxwings, 53

Cedar Waxwings, 2

American Tree Sparrows, 173

Dark-eyed Junco, 65

Snow Bunting, 326

Cardinals, 40

Brown-headed Cowbird, 1

Pine Grosbeak, 1

Purple Finch, 5

House Finch, 9

Common Redpoll, 732

Pine Siskin, 1

American Goldfinch, 233

Evening Grosbeaks, 66

House Sparrow, 169

Participants on the count gathered at the end of the day in Kelly’s Loft Restaurant and Pub, Highway 29, to watch the results being listed and to share experiences and refreshments. The CBC was sponsored by the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists and organized by Cliff Bennett. Georgina Doe, Carleton Place, assisted by Libby Goddard, Almonte, coordinated the feeder counts and results were compiled and forwarded to Bird Studies Canada by Mike Jaques, Beckwith.

Press Release
Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists
January 4, 2003
Written by: Cliff Bennett

OwlThe 58th Annual Carleton Place Christmas Bird Count took place on Friday, Dec. 27. The count area, centred on the bridge in Carleton Place, includes areas almost to Innisville, Ferguson Falls and Union Hall, Almonte, east to Dwyer Hill Road, South to Ashton and Franktown. Twenty-nine field observers took to the rural roads, trails and woodlots and, during the course of the day, counted 5600 individual birds of thirty-nine different species. In addition, thirty-seven residents with feeders at home, counted a further 1012 birds bringing the total for the day to 6612.

The results of this count, which can be viewed on http://www.audubon.org/bird/cbc, were slightly lower in species but higher in numbers from previous years. Record high numbers of mourning doves, northern flicker, blue jays, robins, starlings and cedar waxwings were tallied. All finches were very low and, for the first year since 1970, there were no evening grosbeaks around.

The Carleton Place count is sponsored by the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists. MVFN Past-President Cliff Bennett organized the teams and areas of the count. MVFN member Georgina Doe coordinated the feeder counts, assisted by MVFN member Libby Goddard. MVFN member Mike Jaques was the official compiler.

Taking part as counters in the field were Al Potvin, Chris Hume, Tine Kuiper, Mike McPhail, Paul Frigon, Pip Winters, Mary and Howard Robinson, Allan and Peter Goddard, Lynda Bennett, all from Mississippi Mills; Don Brown, Rick Muise, Ken and Eileen Ross, all from Ottawa; Bruce Legallais, Bobby and John Clarke, Lanark Highlands; Mike and Joyce Jaques, Arnie Simpson, Joel Byrne, from Beckwith; Brenda Carter, Ed LeBlanc and Rick Carter, Merrickville and Ian and Susan Wilkes, Carleton Place.

Results of the count are as follows:

Canada Goose (8), Mallards (4), Common Goldeneye (16), Common Merganser (24), Sharp-shinned hawk (1), Red-tailed Hawk (6), Rough-legged Hawk (5), Ruffed Grouse (10), Rock Dove (656), Mourning Doves (376), Snowy Owl (1), Downy Woodpecker (71), Hairy Woodpecker (59), Northern Flicker (2), Pileated Woodpecker (9), Northern Shrike (3), Blue Jay (642), Crow (249), Ravens (8), Black-capped Chickadee (866), Red-breasted Nuthatch (4), White-breasted Nuthatch (101), Brown Creeper (5), Golden-crowned Kinglet (4), Robins (338), Starlings (1290), Bohemian Waxwing (21), Cedar Waxwing (432), Tree Sparrows (325), Song Sparrow (1), White-crowned Sparrow (1), Junco (123), Snow Bunting (352), Cardinal (61), Purple Finch (80), House Finch (112), Common Redpoll (30), Goldfinch (146), House Sparrow (170).

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